Material Yarn & Textiles

In general, yarns may be defined as a linear assemblage of oriented twisted fibres held together by friction. The yarn can enhance good fibre performance or compensate for poor fibre performance. Usually they are used as raw material for woven-textiles, have good tensile strength, high flexibility, and are electrical and thermal insulators.

A textile (fabric or cloth) is a two-dimensional structure consisting of fibres held together exclusively by friction. This usually gives a porous and flexible material, with a huge inner surface. Porosity is essential for insulation properties and permeability to water vapour.

The properties of textiles depend on the chemical and physical properties of the fibres, the method used to process them (for example braiding, felting, lacing, tufting or weaving) and the mechanical or chemical post-treatments.

Interlaced textiles

Braided textiles
Crochet textile
Knitwear
Lace
Tufted textiles
Woven fabric

Non interlaced textiles

Felt
Fibre web
Film
Foam
Leather
Paper
Bast
BARKTEX(R)

Yarns

Continous filament
String
Rope

References For materials in general see:
Machine Design On-line
Materials by Design
ViMS (Visualizations in Material Science)
Photo Thomas Nissen (Computer graphics)
Copyright © 1996-2006 Torben Lenau
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